7 Tips For Making A Short Film — Chad Meisenheimer

Film Courage: What is your step-by-step guide to producing a short film here in Los Angeles?

Chad Meisenheimer, Actor/Writer/Comic/Director: A short film…first page count. Everyone always thinks what kind of short film do you want to make? Something that is doable or attainable for you location wise, knowing something you can get for cheap or free. Don’t have a lot of locations, don’t have a lot of actors. I always say work indoors because there are less elements like rain, animals, people, crowds and stuff like that. If you’re going to do your first short or second short, always keep it between…(Watch the video interview on Youtube here).

   

About Chad (from IMDB Bio):

Born in the 1980’s but raised by the 1990’s. Chad Meisenheimer is an award-winning and critically acclaimed Los Angeles based Content Creator – Actor – Comedian – Podcast Host originally from the San Francisco Bay Area. He formed MaxiMeise Productions with his late brother, Brent Meisenheimer (1986-2007) in 2000 while attending the film department at Solano Community College. Chad has also co-founded Just Trust Me Productions with Chester Finney (2011-2013) and Chad Meisenheimer Comedy Presents in 2012. He’s an alumni from Solano Community College with an Associate of Arts Degree in Film/Television Production and a graduate of the two year acting conservatory, the Actors Training Program in partnership with Solano College Theater (Now defunct).

 

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Related videos:
Should Filmmakers Make Short Films or Features?
For The Majority Of Filmmakers, A $50,000 Short Film Is A Mistake by James Kicklighter
Why Short Films Can Be A Waste Of Time by Daniel Stamm
 


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